Latest news in Cannabis.

Why Are Charities Too Good for Marijuana Money? · High Times

Weed just wanna help. 

Why are charities too good for marijuana money?

  • Politicians in Colorado, California, Oregon and other states where the robust marijuana industry’s billions flow have been happy to capitalize on the bounty—the bounty of money, and the bounty of people with money, eager to convert their cash into political influence.
  • And in Denver, the local Rescue Mission, a local homeless-services organization, ended up with the money from Organa that the children’s hospital and other outfits turned down.
  • A local veterans’ organization also accepted Organa’s money—which was used to purchase cannabis products not covered by vets’ healthcare plans.
  • In Calaveras County in California’s rural heartland, where the economy is slow and budgets are lean, an outfit called the Calaveras Cannabis Alliance attempted to give money to a local school and to a local senior-services organization.
  • This won’t last forever, as everyone—banks, the government and charities—discover that marijuana money is just like everyone else’s: dirty and covered in drugs.

Politicians in Colorado, California, Oregon and other states where the robust marijuana industry’s billions flow have been happy to capitalize on the bounty—the bounty of money, and the bounty of people with money, eager to convert their cash into political influence.

Politicians in Colorado, California, Oregon and other states where the robust marijuana industry’s billions flow have been happy to capitalize on the bounty—the bounty of money, and the bounty of people with money, eager to convert their cash into political influence.

As the Los Angeles Times reported, the cannabis industry has a clear favorite (and chief beneficiary of their generosity) in the race to become California’s next governor in Gavin Newsom, the state’s lieutenant governor and the most prestigious support of last year’s successful legalization effort. In Nevada, the marijuana industry is making its preference for the Democratic Party clear—hardly surprising, given Republican sugar daddy Sheldon Adelson’s (failed) effort to put it out of business.

This is fine—marijuana is a business and deserves to hire lobbyists, lawyers and attempt to influence lawmakers like any other. There’s Big Oil and Big Tech, and soon there will be Big Weed. This is part of what legalization is all about.

But when a business is successful, along with political spending comes philanthropy: endowing chairs at universities, paying to put your name on hospitals or, in modest, small-town Chamber of Commerce ways, improving your community.

And as Forbes notes, charities have proven far less willing to take weed money than would-be elected officials.

One of Colorado’s bigger marijuana companies is Organa Brands. Denver-based Organa is the parent company of…

Why Are Charities Too Good for Marijuana Money? · High Times

Comments are closed, but trackbacks and pingbacks are open.

Subscribe To Personalized Notifications

You are subscribing to jobs matching your current search criteria.

Email Notifications

Email notifications will be sent to you Subscribe

 

Custom RSS Feed

Your personalized RSS Feed is below, copy the address to your RSS reader. Subscribe