Nevada Senate Bill Would Allow Some Public Use of Marijuana

Nevada Senate Bill Would Allow Some Public Use of #Marijuana

  • A bill introduced in the Nevada Senate would allow public use of marijuana in certain circumstances, according to a March 6, 2017, article in the Las Vegas Review-Journal.
  • Senate Bill 236—introduced on March 6, 2017, by state Sen. Tick Segerblom, a Democrat from Las Vegas—would allow local governments to give licenses to businesses and events so patrons can use marijuana publicly.
  • If the bill passes, familiar restrictions would apply for public pot use: patrons would have to be 21 years of age or older, and qualifying businesses and events would have to be 1,000 feet or more from schools, churches, parks and daycare centers.
  • Although last fall the Nevada Gaming Commission said casinos should not permit or encourage public marijuana use, Segerblom said tourists need a place to consume pot legally, especially in Clark County, which includes Las Vegas.
  • Two county commissioners, Steve Sisolak and Mary Beth Scow, told the Review-Journal in January they thought any conversation about public use right now would be too soon after the state legalized recreational use.

A bill introduced in the Nevada Senate would allow public use of marijuana in certain circumstances, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

@MJINews: Nevada Senate Bill Would Allow Some Public Use of #Marijuana

A bill introduced in the Nevada Senate would allow public use of marijuana in certain circumstances, according to a March 6, 2017, article in the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

As of Jan. 1, 2017, Nevadans can possess marijuana, but they can use it only in private residences. Senate Bill 236—introduced on March 6, 2017, by state Sen. Tick Segerblom, a Democrat from Las Vegas—would allow local governments to give licenses to businesses and events so patrons can use marijuana publicly.

If the bill passes, familiar restrictions would apply for public pot use: patrons would have to be 21 years of age or older, and qualifying businesses and events would have to be 1,000 feet or more from schools, churches, parks and daycare centers.

Although last fall the Nevada Gaming Commission said casinos should not permit or encourage public marijuana use, Segerblom said tourists need a place to consume pot legally, especially in Clark County, which includes Las Vegas. Two county commissioners, Steve Sisolak and Mary Beth Scow, told the Review-Journal in January they thought any conversation about public use right now would be too soon after the state legalized recreational use.

The bill is now in the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Nevada Senate Bill Would Allow Some Public Use of Marijuana

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